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Canadian Five Cent Coins

Calgary Coin offers one of the most extensive selections of Canadian five cent coins for sale on the internet, with most dates available in a variety of grades and price ranges for all collectors. We price from the Canadian Coin News trend sheet, offering most coins well below the prices listed there. We grade conservatively and any significant defects described. If you ever order a coin from us that you are not happy with, it can be returned for a full refund. For those new to coin collecting and who are not familiar with the meaning of the grading codes that preceded each price, information on them can be found on our Canadian Coin Introduction Page.



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ALL PRICES ON THIS PAGE ARE IN CANADIAN DOLLARS
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SILVER FIVE CENTS

Because of their very small size, these silver five cent pieces were sometimes referred to as "FISH SCALES".

QUEEN VICTORIA
1837 TO 1901

PROVINCE OF CANADA

In 1858, 5 cent coins were struck with the Victorian young head design. While identical in design to those later coins issued under the Dominion of Canada starting in 1870, these 1858 coins were issued for the British territory then known as the Province of Canada. The design was by Leonard C. Wyon. These were of an alloy containing 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper, to a standard of 1.16 grams and with a 15.5 mm diameter. The die axis was 180 degrees, which is called coinage alignment.

The 1858 5 cent coins come with large and small date varieties, with the large date being much rarer than the small date.


1858 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1858 5 CENT


  1. 1858 small date ............ obverse mark F-12   $30.00

DOMINION OF CANADA


1870 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)


Unlike the other denominations except for the 10 cent, the Wyon young head design continued to be used after Confederation, from the first issue in 1870 until 1901. The standards remain the same as the 1858 issue, with the weight 1.16 grams, diameter of 15.5 mm and the coinage die axis of 180 degrees. The coins were struck at the British Royal mint in London England, unless they have the H mint mark, in which case they were struck at the Heaton mint in Birmingham England.


1870 5 CENT

1870 5 cents come with either wide flat borders (FB or WB) or narrower more rounded borders (RB or NB). There is no significant difference in rarity between the two types. All dates after 1870 are NB.


  1. 1870 flat border ............ toned ICCS XF-40   SOLD
     
  2. 1870 rounded border ..................... F-12   SOLD

1871 5 CENT


  1. 1871 ....................... dig on neck XF-40   SOLD

1872 H 5 CENT


  1. 1872 H ............................ ICCS VF-20   $72.50

In 1874, there are two varieties of 5 cent coins. The first is known as the "crosslet 4" which has a small vertical bar at the very back of the four, and a slightly larger date (some references call this the "large date" variety). The second variety is the "plain 4" which lacks that small upright at the back of the four, and has a slightly smaller date (and some references call the small date variety). The plain 4 is very slightly scarcer than the crosslet 4, but the difference is minor and there is no significant difference in the values.


1874 H 5 CENT


  1. 1874 H plain 4 .................... ICCS VG-10   SOLD
     
  2. 1874 H crosslet 4 ........ ICCS rim nicks F-15   SOLD

1875 H 5 CENT


  1. 1875 H small date ................. ICCS VG-10  $250.00

1880 5 CENT


  1. 1880 H obverse 3 ....... MOTTLED COLOR, VF-20   SOLD

1881 H 5 CENT


  1. 1881 H ......... nicely toned ..... ICCS VF-30   SOLD

1882 H 5 CENT


  1. 1882 H .................................. VG-8   SOLD

1883 H 5 CENT


  1. 1883 H obverse 5 ................... ICCS F-15   $77.50
  2. 1883 H obverse 5 ....................... VF-30  $160.00

1884 5 CENT


  1. 1884 near 4 ............................ VG-10   SOLD

In 1885 and 1886, there are varieties with large and small last digits in the date, plus in 1885 there is a scarcer variety with the small 5 punched over a large 5.


1885 CENT


  1. 1885 small 5 ............................. G-6   $12.50

1886 5 CENT


  1. 1886 small 6 .... scratches and rim nicks F-12   SOLD
     
  2. 1886 large 6 .................... cleaned F-12   SOLD

1887 5 CENT


  1. 1887 .................................... F-12   $50.00
     
  2. 1887 7/7 (7/high 7, RP3) .......... ICCS VF-20  $160.00

1888 5 CENT


  1. 1888 .................................... VG-8   $ 8.50
  2. 1888 .................................... F-12   $15.00
  3. 1888 .................................... F-15   $24.50

1889 5 CENT


  1. 1889 ..................................... G-6   $25.00
  2. 1889 .................................... F-15   $77.50
  3. 1889 ................................... VF-30  $160.00
  4. 1889 ................................... XF-40  $225.00
  5. 1889 ................................... XF-45  $285.00

1890 H 5 CENT


  1. 1890 H ............................ toned F-15   $25.00
  2. 1890 H ............. cleaned, dark spots VF-20   $20.00
  3. 1890 H ........................... toned VF-30   $52.50

1891 5 CENT


  1. 1891 obverse 2 ......................... VF-30   $32.50
     
  2. 1891 obverse 5 ......................... VF-20   $20.00
  3. 1891 obverse 5 ................... toned VF-30   $25.00

In older references 1892 is listed with both obverse 2 and obverse 5. The two can be difficult to tell a part and even I have made that mistake in the past. More recent research suggests that only obverse 2 exist and that any offered as obverse 5 are probably miss-identified obverse 2 examples.


1892 5 CENT

Some older references list with both obverse 2 and 5 for 1892, but only obverse 2 exists and any said to be obverse 5 are miss-identified obverse 2 (they can be difficult to tell a part).


  1. 1892 ................................... VF-20   $33.50

1893 5 CENT


  1. 1893 .................................... F-12   $11.00
  2. 1893 ................... lightly cleaned VF-20   $12.50
  3. 1893 ................................... VF-30   $31.50

In 1893 there is a fairly distinctive variety not yet recognized in the standard references, which a large 9 punched over a small nine. It was published in the 1960's by Hans Zoell and is his number T120n. Because the type is not generally recognized, it is seldom picked out, and it's relative rarity to the standard type is as yet uncertain.


1893 VARIETY CENT


  1. 1893 large 9 / small 9 .................. F-15   SOLD

1894 5 CENT


  1. 1894 ................................... VG-10   $32.50
  2. 1894 .................................... F-15   $67.50
  3. 1894 ................... light scratches VF-20   $62.50
  4. 1894 ........................... cleaned VF-30   $77.50
  5. 1894 ................................... AU-50  $275.00

1896 5 CENT


  1. 1896 ................................... VF-30   $33.50

1897 5 CENT

Four varieties exist for 1997:

1) narrow 8 - most common.
2) Wide 8.
3) narrow 8 over wide 8.
4) 7 over 7 with a standard narrow 8 - scarcest type.


  1. 1897 narrow 8 ..................... toned F-15   SOLD
     
  2. 1897 wide 8 ............. heavy hairlined F-15   SOLD

1898 5 CENT


  1. 1898 ...................... old cleaning XF-40   $80.00
  2. 1898 .............................. ICCS EF-45  $175.00
  3. 1898 ............... trace obverse marks AU-50  $155.00

1899 5 CENT

I have noted a variety in 1899 with a small 2nd 9, which I have not seen listed in any standard references.


  1. 1899 .............................. toned F-15   $12.50
  2. 1899 ..................... tiny rim nick AU-50   $57.50

1900 5 CENT

The 1900 5 cent exists with either large (or round) and small (or oval) 0's in the date, with the large 0's the rarer of the two.


  1. 1900 oval 0's .................... toned VF-20   $16.50
  2. 1900 oval 0's ..................... ICCS VF-30   $24.00
     
  3. 1900 round 0's .......................... F-12   $55.00
  4. 1900 round 0's ............. dig on chin, F-15   $55.00
  5. 1900 round 0's .......................... F-15   $67.50
  6. 1900 round 0's ............. edge nicks, VF-20   $52.50
  7. 1900 round 0's .................... ICCS VF-20   $82.50
  8. 1900 round 0's ............ light marks, VF-30   $80.00
  9. 1900 round 0's ......................... VF-30  $125.00
  10. 1900 round 0's ........... marks on neck XF-40  $120.00

1901 5 CENT


  1. 1901 .................. a few dark spots VF-20   $15.00
  2. 1901 ............................. toned VF-20   $16.50
  3. 1901 .............................. ICCS VF-30   $24.50
  4. 1901 ................................... XF-40   $33.50
  5. 1901 ............... light obverse marks AU-50   $62.50
  6. 1901 .............................. PCGS MS-60  $160.00

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EDWARD VII
1902 TO 1910

The Edward VII five cent design is by George W. DeSaulles, with the portrait of Edward VII on the obverse. The reverse is similar to the Victorian type except that the word "CANADA" was moved from below the monarch head on the obverse to just above the date on the reverse.

The standards remain the same as the Victorian coins: with a weight of 1.16 grams; a diameter of 15.5 mm, and struck from 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper. From 1902 to 1907 they this have a "coinage" 180 degree die axis, and are without a mint mark if struck at the British Royal mint in London England, or have an "H" mint mark for those struck at the Heaton mint in Birmingham England. Starting in 1908, all of the coins were struck without a mint marks but this now designates the new Royal Canadian mint in Ottawa. Also in 1908, the die axis changed to "medal axis" or 0 degrees (normally used for war medals).


1903 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1902 5 CENT


  1. 1902 ............................. toned VF-30   $ 7.75

1902 H 5 CENT

For 1902 there is a common small "H", a slightly scarcer large H and occasionally one sees coins with a large H over small H.


  1. 1902 small H ............................ F-12   SOLD
     
  2. 1902 large H ............................. G-6   SOLD
     
  3. 1902 large H/small H ................... XF-40   SOLD

Prior to 1903 Edwardian 5 cent coins had a St. Edward's crown at the top of the reverse, with 21 leaves in the wreath. That design is retained for the Heaton (H) mint coins right up to 1907 but starting in 1903 coins struck at the Royal Mint in London (which do not have the H) have W. H. J. Blakemore's design slightly modified with the Imperial state crown and 22 leaves in the wreath.


1903 5 CENT


  1. 1903 .............................. toned F-12   $10.00
  2. 1903 ................................... VF-30   $35.00
  3. 1903 .............................. ICCS AU-58  $210.00

1903 H 5 CENT

For 1903 there are small and large H examples with the large H scarcer. There are also some with the small H slightly re-cut to look sightly doubled.


  1. 1903 small H ............................. G-6   SOLD
     
  2. 1903 large H ............................ F-12   $29.50
  3. 1903 large H ...................... toned F-15   $40.00
  4. 1903 large H ............................ F-15   $40.00
  5. 1903 large H ........................... VF-20   $55.00
  6. 1903 large H ................... cleaned VF-30   $42.50
  7. 1903 large H ........................... VF-30   $75.00
     
  8. 1903 small H recut ...................... F-12   SOLD

1904 5 CENT


  1. 1904 ................................... VF-30   SOLD

1905 5 CENT


  1. 1905 .................................... F-15   $ 6.50
  2. 1905 ........................... scratch VF-20   $ 6.00
  3. 1905 ................................... VF-20   $ 9.50
  4. 1905 ................................... VF-30   SOLD

1906 5 CENT


  1. 1906 ............................ scratch VG-8   $ 2.00
  2. 1906 .............................. toned F-15   $ 5.00
  3. 1906 ............................. toned VF-20   $ 6.75

1907 5 CENT


  1. 1907 ..................................... G-4   $ 2.00
  2. 1907 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.25
  3. 1907 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.50
  4. 1907 .................................... F-12   $ 3.50
  5. 1907 .................................... F-15   $ 4.50
  6. 1907 ................................... VF-20   $ 6.00
  7. 1907 ....................... light marks VF-30   $ 5.00
  8. 1907 .............................. ICCS AU-55   $52.50

The Royal Canadian Mint opened in Ottawa in 1908 at which point nearly all Canadian coins were minted in Canada. The designs remained the same but the die axis changes from "coinage" to "medal" on all denominations except for the 1 cent which were always medal axis. Coinage axis means if you place your fingers above and below the portrait then spin the coin side to side, the reverse comes out upside down. Medal axis means it stays right side up.


1908 5 CENT

1908 5 cent coins come with either a small or large 8, also called small and large date although only the 8 is different.


  1. 1908 small date .......................... G-6   SOLD
  2. 1908 large date ................. scratch F-12   SOLD

In 1909 and 1910 two different leaf shapes occur on the reverse wreath, with some having slightly rounded tips similar to maple leaves and others have more pointed tips similar to holly leaves. They can be slightly difficult to tell a part. Some references refer to them as pointed leaf (PL) and round leaf (RL) and other maple leaf (ML) and holly leaf (HL).


1909 5 CENT


  1. 1909 pointed leaves ........ minor marks XF-40   SOLD
     
  2. 1909 rounded leaves ............... ICCS MS-60  $250.00

1910 5 CENT


  1. 1910 pointed leaves ...................... G-4   $ 2.00
  2. 1910 pointed leaves ...................... G-6   $ 2.25
  3. 1910 pointed leaves ...... slightly rough F-15   $ 2.50
  4. 1910 pointed leaves ..................... F-15   $ 4.50
     
  5. 1910 rounded leaves ...................... G-4   $10.00
  6. 1910 rounded leaves ...................... G-6   $14.00
  7. 1910 rounded leaves ..................... VG-8   $16.50
  8. 1910 rounded leaves ..................... F-12   $25.00
  9. 1910 rounded leaves ..................... F-15   $35.00
  10. 1910 rounded leaves ............... ICCS VF-30   $77.50
  11. 1910 rounded leaves .................... VF-30   $77.50

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GEORGE V
1911 to 1936

The 1903 reverse design by W. H. J. Blakemore was retained, along with the standards of a 1.16 grams, 15.5 mm, and an alloy of from 92.5% silver and 7.5% copper until 1919 when the alloy was reduced to 80% silver and 20% copper.


1911 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1911 5 CENT

George V coins were introduced in 1911 with "DEI GRATIA", Latin for "God' Grace", omitted from the obverse inscription. Known as the "GODLESS COINS" there was a public out rage and in 1912 "DEI GRATIA" returned to Canadian coins.


  1. 1911 Godless ............................. G-6   SOLD

1912 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1912 5 CENT


  1. 1912 ..................................... G-4   $ 1.75
  2. 1912 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.00
  3. 1912 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.50
  4. 1912 ................................... VG-10   $ 3.00
  5. 1912 ......................... hairlined VF-30   $ 5.00
  6. 1912 ................................... XF-45   $19.50

1913 5 CENT


  1. 1913 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.00
  2. 1913 ............................ cleaned VG-8   $ 2.00
  3. 1913 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.50
  4. 1913 ................................... VG-10   $ 3.00
  5. 1913 .................................... F-15   $ 4.00
  6. 1913 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00

1914 5 CENT


  1. 1914 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.00
  2. 1914 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.50
  3. 1914 .................... minor scratches F-12   $ 2.50
  4. 1914 .................................... F-12   $ 3.50
  5. 1914 ......................... dark spots F-15   $ 4.50
  6. 1914 .................................... F-15   $ 5.00
  7. 1914 ................................... MS-64  $410.00

1915 5 CENT


  1. 1915 .................................... VG-8   $15.00

1916 5 CENT


  1. 1916 ................................... VF-20   $12.50
  2. 1916 ................................... AU-50   $62.50

1917 5 CENT


  1. 1917 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.00
  2. 1917 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.25
  3. 1917 ................................... VG-10   $ 2.50
  4. 1917 ...................... faint scratch F-12   $ 2.50
  5. 1917 .................................... F-12   $ 3.00
  6. 1917 .................................... F-15   $ 3.50
  7. 1917 ................................... VF-20   $ 4.50
  8. 1917 ........................... cleaned VF-30   $ 4.50
  9. 1917 ..................... faint scratch VF-30   $ 4.00
  10. 1917 ................................... VF-30   $ 6.50
  11. 1917 .............................. ICCS AU-58   $50.00

1918 5 CENT


  1. 1918 ..................................... G-6   $ 1.50
  2. 1918 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.00
  3. 1918 ....................... light marks VG-10   $ 1.50
  4. 1918 ................................... VG-10   $ 2.50
  5. 1918 ...................... faint scratch F-12   $ 2.00
  6. 1918 ................................... VF-30   $ 5.75
  7. 1918 ......................... hairlined XF-40   $ 4.00
  8. 1918 .............................. ICCS MS-62   $55.00
  9. 1918 .............................. ICCS MS-63   $82.50
  10. 1918 ................ light toneing ICCS MS-64  $150.00

1919 5 CENT


  1. 1919 ..................................... G-6   $ 1.75
  2. 1919 ...................... light scratch VG-8   $ 2.00
  3. 1919 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.25
  4. 1919 .............................. toned VG-8   $ 2.25
  5. 1919 ................................... VG-10   $ 2.50
  6. 1919 .................................... F-12   $ 3.00
  7. 1919 ............................ cleaned F-15   $ 1.75
  8. 1919 ................................... AU-50   $16.00
  9. 1919 .............................. ICCS MS-64  $150.00

During 1920 and 1921 5 cent silver coins of George 5th remain the same design, weight and diameter as earlier coins but the alloy was reduced to 80% silver and 20% copper.


1920 5 CENT


  1. 1920 ..................................... G-6   $ 2.00
  2. 1920 ........................... rim nick VG-8   $ 1.75
  3. 1920 ...................... minor scratch VG-8   $ 1.75
  4. 1920 .................................... VG-8   $ 2.25
  5. 1920 ................................... VG-10   $ 2.50
  6. 1920 ......................... edge nicks F-12   $ 2.00
  7. 1920 ........................ light marks F-12   $ 1.50
  8. 1920 .................................... F-12   $ 3.00
  9. 1920 .................................... F-15   $ 3.50
  10. 1920 .................... slightly rough VF-20   $ 2.00
  11. 1920 ................................... VF-20   $ 4.00
  12. 1920 .................... gouge on crown VF-30   $ 3.25
  13. 1920 ............................. toned VF-30   $ 6.00
  14. 1920 ............ light scratch on cheek AU-50   $12.50
  15. 1920 ................................... MS-62   $50.00

1921 5 CENT

Many 1921 5 cents were struck but most were melted after the decision stop striking 5 cent coins from silver. 1921 5 cents are now rare and estimates of how many exist vary considerably, but based on how often I encounter them I believe there are probably about 3000. I AM ALWAYS LOOKING TO PURCHASE EXAMPLES OF THIS DATE.


  1. 1921 .... dark tone with two marks in front of
    the portrait not mentioned on the ICCS holder
    but struck with strong dies on both sides
    which compensates for the marks ... ICCS VG-10   SOLD

1998 5 CENT SILVER

To commemorate the Royal Canadian Mint's 90th anniversary sets of coins including a 5 cent silver were struck with the sizes, alloys, and general reverse designs of the 1908 coins, but Queen Elizabeth's portrait and the date shown as "1908 - 1998". The early sets have an antiqued matte-proof finish that proved unpopular so later sets were issued with a mirror-proof finish.


  1. 1908-1998 ........................ MATTE-PROOF   SOLD
     
  2. 1908-1998 ....................... MIRROR-PROOF   SOLD

_

FIVE CENT NICKELS
(AND TOMBAC)

GEORGE V (continued)

1922 saw a dramatic change in the Canadian 5 cent coins. Today we call these coins nickels because they were made of nickel. The weight was increased to 4.54 grams (100 to the pound which was not a coincidence) with a diameter to 21.21 mm. The pre-1922 obverse design by Sir E. B. Mackennal is retained, but there is a new reverse design, by W. H. J. Blakemore.

The Royal Canadian Mint was not set up for striking nickel, a much harder alloy than silver or bronze. If you examine any number of these coins in high grades, you will quickly find the strikes are not consistent. This was because the mint sourced there nickel from the International Nickel Company (INCO) which at that time used a furnace based refining method which produce nickel that varied between 88 and 92% nickel, varying even within one batch. Two nickels struck from blanks cut from the same nickel sheet could have slightly different purity which also means slightly different hardness with the purer the alloy the softer it was. Nickels struck on 92% pure blanks might show all 8 pears on the crown band, while most were below that purity and so harder and only 6 (and occasionally only 4) might be present. Because of this the usual rule that George V coin cannot be graded XF or better without all 8 pearls visible does not apply to these nickels and other features must be examined to determine the amount of wear (the grade) on the coins. On examples of these nickels grading XF or better, I will state how many of the pearls are visible. Price guides only assume average 6 bead strikes, so I charge a premium for 8 pearl examples, with the amount of the premium directly related to the strength of the beads directly in front of the center diamond.

This information came out on March 2, 2014 at an Edmonton coin show reception where I heard Mark Bink (an metallurgist who studies these alloys) make a comment about 1961 being the year the beaver got it's whiskers back. I asked him what that meant and he explained to me the inconsistent nature of the alloys (which changed in 1961). A discussion followed where I brought up the erratic striking characteristics of the coins, and we suddenly realized how the two were directly related.

A problem for nickels is they saw extensive use in parking meters and vending machines which caused scratches across the face which are commonly called "meter scratches". Such scratches are to be expected on coins grading VG or lower, but we will note them if they are heavy. On coins grading Fine or higher we will note any such scratches, no matter how light. I discount the prices on all that show such scratches if grading Fine or better.

Canada 5 cent 1931
George V 1922 to 1936, type only
(image of type only)

1922 5 CENT

Two distinct varieties of the 1922 5 cent exist, most have the "S" in "CENTS" nearly touching the rim so are called near rim, and a smaller number have a distinct gap so are referred to as far rim.


  1. 1922 near rim .......................... VG-10   $ 0.60
  2. 1922 near rim ........................... F-15   $ 1.75
     
  3. 1922 FAR RIM ........................... VF-30   SOLD

1923 5 CENT


  1. 1923 ................................... VG-10   $ 1.00
  2. 1923 ................................... VF-30   $12.00
  3. 1923 ................... 6 beads ....... XF-40   $22.50

1924 5 CENT


  1. 1924 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  2. 1924 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  3. 1924 ................................... VF-30   $ 8.50

1925 5 CENT


  1. 1925 .............................. ICCS VG-10   $77.50
  2. 1925 ............................... ICCS F-12   $85.00
  3. 1925 .................................... F-15  $115.00
  4. 1925 ................................... VF-20  $130.00
  5. 1925 .............................. ICCS VF-30  $210.00
  6. 1925 ............... slightly toned ICCS VF-30  $210.00
  7. 1925 ........ a nice lustrous coin, ICCS VF-30  $220.00

The 1926 5 cent comes in two varieties with respect to the position of the 6 in the date. On the variety known as the near 6, the six is rotated slightly so that the tip of the 6 is closer to the maple leaf, and the bottom is farther from the rim. Likewise, on the far 6 variety the tip of the 6 is slightly farther from the maple leaf, and the bottom is slightly closer to the rim of the coin. It is important to look at the spacing from the rim, as well as from the maple leaf, because some people have tried to turn a near six into a far six by shaving down the tip, but they cannot add metal to make the bottom nearer to the rim.

1926 near 61926 far 6
1926 NEAR 61926 FAR 6

1926 near 6 5 CENT


  1. 1926 near 6 .................... scratches G-6   $ 2.00
  2. 1926 near 6 ................... scratches VG-8   $ 3.00
  3. 1926 near 6 ....................... stain VG-8   $ 3.00
  4. 1926 near 6 ............................. VG-8   $ 3.75
  5. 1926 near 6 .................. scratches VG-10   $ 3.50
  6. 1926 near 6 ................. minor mark VG-10   $ 4.00
  7. 1926 near 6 ............................ VG-10   $ 5.50
  8. 1926 near 6 ......... dings and scratches F-12   $ 3.00
  9. 1926 near 6 ................... scratches F-12   $ 6.00
  10. 1926 near 6 .................. minor mark F-15   $ 8.00
  11. 1926 near 6 ............................. F-15   $13.50
  12. 1926 near 6 ............................ VF-20   $21.00
  13. 1926 near 6 ...... light reverse scratch VF-30   $21.00
  14. 1926 near 6 ........ 6 bead ....... ICCS XF-45  $140.00

1926 far 6 5 CENT


  1. 1926 far 6 ......................... ICCS VG-8  $145.00
  2. 1926 far 6 ......... small mark on crown XF-40  $625.00

1927 5 CENT


  1. 1927 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  2. 1927 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  3. 1927 .................................... F-15   $ 1.75
  4. 1927 ................................... VF-20   $ 3.50
  5. 1927 ................................... VF-30   $ 7.00
  6. 1927 .............................. ICCS VF-30   $ 7.00
  7. 1927 .............. 7 beads, minor spots XF-40   $10.00

1928 5 CENT


  1. 1928 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  2. 1928 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  3. 1928 .................................... F-15   $ 1.75
  4. 1928 ................... 7 beads ....... XF-45   $25.00

In 1929, 1932, 1934 and 1936 references designate NEAR and FAR types referring to the gap between the S of CENTS and the rims as we see on the 1922 nickel, however there is significant difference in the gap on these dates, making things very confusing. The actual difference is flat and concave fields. On flat field examples fields and rim meet with a sharp angle, while on concave fields that angle is slightly rounded. In 1929, 1934 and 1936 both the Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins tend sheet lists both types at about the same value. In 1932 the Canadian Coin News trend sheet the flat field is listed far higher value for concave fields, but the Charlton Catalogue does not and at this point I am not certain which is correct but for now I am assuming the Charlton Catalogue is. For now, as I feel there is no difference in value, I am not sorting them out by those varieties.


1929 5 CENT


  1. 1929 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  2. 1929 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  3. 1929 .................... light scratches F-15   $ 1.00
  4. 1929 .................................... F-15   $ 1.75
  5. 1929 ..................... faint scratch VF-20   $ 2.00
  6. 1929 ................................... VF-20   $ 3.50
  7. 1929 ................................... VF-30   $ 6.50

1930 5 CENT


  1. 1930 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  2. 1930 .................................... F-12   $ 1.25
  3. 1930 ........................ light marks F-15   $ 1.25
  4. 1930 .................................... F-15   $ 2.50
  5. 1930 ................................... VF-20   $ 4.00
  6. 1930 ....................... light toned VF-30   $ 8.00
  7. 1930 ..... 7 beads ..... light scratches XF-40   $10.00

1931 5 CENT


  1. 1931 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  2. 1931 .................................... F-15   $ 2.50
  3. 1931 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00

1932 5 CENT


  1. 1932 ................................... VG-10   $ 0.75
  2. 1932 .................................... F-12   $ 1.25
  3. 1932 .................................... F-15   $ 2.50
  4. 1932 ....................... light marks VF-20   $ 3.50
  5. 1932 ......................... scratches VF-20   $ 3.50
  6. 1932 ................................... VF-20   $ 5.00
  7. 1932 ....................... light marks VF-30   $ 5.00
  8. 1932 ......................... edge bump VF-30   $ 8.50
  9. 1932 ..................... light scratch VF-30   $ 8.50

1933 5 CENT


  1. 1933 .................................... F-15   $ 4.00
  2. 1933 ................................... VF-20   $ 6.75
  3. 1933 ................................... VF-30   $13.50

1934 5 CENT


  1. 1934 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  2. 1934 .................... light scratches F-15   $ 1.50
  3. 1934 .................................... F-15   $ 2.50
  4. 1934 ..................... minor scratch VF-20   $ 2.00
  5. 1934 ................................... VF-20   $ 4.00
  6. 1934 ......................... scratches VF-30   $ 4.00
  7. 1934 ................... 6 beads ....... XF-40   $19.50

1935 5 CENT


  1. 1935 .................................... F-12   $ 1.50
  2. 1935 .................................... F-15   $ 2.50
  3. 1935 ................... light scratches VF-20   $ 2.50
  4. 1935 ................................... VF-20   $ 4.00
  5. 1935 ................................... VF-30   $ 8.50

1936 5 CENT


  1. 1936 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00
  2. 1936 .................................... F-15   $ 1.50
  3. 1936 ................... light scratches VF-20   $ 1.75
  4. 1936 ................................... VF-20   $ 2.50
  5. 1936 ................................... VF-30   $ 5.00
  6. 1936 ................... 7 beads ....... XF-40   $10.00

_

GEORGE VI
1937 to 1952

1937 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

With George VI coming to the throne in 1937, an new set of designs was introduced for the reverse of all Canadian coins other than silver dollars, with the beaver chosen for the 5 cent coins. There are no rare dates in this series, although there are some rare varieties for some dates such as the 1947 dot, 1951 high relief, 1953 mules, 1964 extra water line and a few others discussed below. Only examples of fairly high quality are worth the time and expense of listing them here. Average circulated examples of most dates are available in our store in a "pick bin" very inexpensively (please do not ask me to pick them out and ship them, they are available in store only).

As these were struck from the same INCO nickel as discussed above the 1922, the same problem of inconsistent hardness remained and in mint state examples one see's a wide variation in the strength of the hair lines on the King, making these somewhat difficult to grade, plus the King's eyebrow rarely strikes up, and finding mint state examples with a fill eyebrow is very difficult (nearly impossible for some dates).


1937 5 CENT

The image above shows a 1937 with the dot after the date. All 1937 5 cent coins have this dot, which the designer felt was needed to balance the design due to lean of the 7 creating a bigger gap to the right than the left of the date.


  1. 1937 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  2. 1937 ................................... AU-50   $ 5.00
  3. 1937 ................................... MS-62   $16.50

1938 5 CENT


  1. 1938 .................................... F-12   $ 1.00

1939 5 CENT


  1. 1939 .................................... F-12   $ 0.50
  2. 1939 .................................... F-15   $ 1.00
  3. 1939 ................................... VF-20   $ 2.00
  4. 1939 ................................... VF-30   $ 3.50
  5. 1939 ................................... XF-40   $ 6.50

1940 5 CENT


  1. 1940 .................................... F-15   $ 1.00
  2. 1940 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1940 ................................... VF-30   $ 2.25

1941 5 CENT


  1. 1941 .................................... F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1941 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1941 ................................... VF-30   $ 2.50
  4. 1941 ................................... XF-40   $ 4.00

1942 5 CENT - NICKEL ALLOY


  1. 1942 nickel ............................. F-15   $ 0.75
  2. 1942 nickel ............................ VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1942 nickel ............................ VF-30   $ 2.50

_

TOMBAC

WW II created a nickel shortage in Canada, so starting part way through 1942, and through all of 1943, Canadian 5 cent coins were struck from a brass alloy called "tombac". The designers of these coins must have realized the color would make them easy to confuse with a one cent coin, so they changed the shape from round to 12 sided. This proved not enough, so in 1942 the traditional beaver design was replaced by the "V" (for victory) design which was used until the war ended in 1945. But even with the 12 sides and the new design there was still confusion, so in 1944 the "tombac" alloy was abandoned and 5 cent coins were struck from chrome plated steel in 1944 and 1945.


1942 tombac 5 cent
(image of type only)

1942 5 CENT - TOMBAC ALLOY


  1. 1942 tombac ............................. F-12   $ 1.00
  2. 1942 tombac ............................ VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1942 tombac ............................ VF-30   $ 1.75
  4. 1942 tombac .............. light scratch XF-40   $ 1.25
  5. 1942 tombac ............................ XF-40   $ 2.00
  6. 1942 tombac ............................ XF-45   $ 2.25
  7. 1942 tombac ............................ AU-50   $ 2.50
  8. 1942 tombac ....................... ICCS MS-64   $32.50
  9. 1942 tombac ...... lamination error .... XF-40   $ 4.50

The twelve sided shape was not enough to stop the confusion with one cent coins, so in 1943 the reverse design was replaced by the "V" (for victory) design which was used until the war ended in 1945.


1943 5 cent
(image of type only)

1943 5 CENT


  1. 1943 tombac ............................ VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1943 tombac ............................ VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1943 tombac ............................ XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1943 tombac ............................ AU-50   $ 2.00
  5. 1943 tombac ............................ MS-60   $ 3.50
  6. 1943 tombac .............. lightly toned MS-62   $ 6.50

_

Chrome-plated steel

In spite of the new reverse design, the public continued to reject the tombac alloy five cent pieces as being too easy to confuse with a one cent when only the head side was visible. The governments response was to return to a silvery colored alloy, but during 1944 and 1945 they were still short of nickel so struck them from steel blanks that had been first nickel plated and then chrome-plated, using the same "V" reverse design as the 1943 tombac nickels. These 1944 and 1945 "V" nickels are very common and of little value in average circulated condition, but are difficult to find in Mint State (MS) conditions.

Some 1944 and 1945 "V" nickel blanks missed the final chrome plating, and are referred to as "no chrome" examples. Since they do have the nickel plating, their color is no different than solid nickel 5 cent coins of other years, but they do have the steel cores.


1944 v 5 cent
(image of type only)


1944 5 CENT


  1. 1944 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  2. 1944 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  3. 1944 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.25
  4. 1944 ................................... AU-50   $ 1.50
  5. 1944 ................................... AU-55   $ 2.00
  6. 1944 ................................... MS-63   $ 6.00
  7. 1944 ................................... MS-64   $12.50
     
  8. 1944 no chrome ......... light scratches, F-15   $ 0.50
  9. 1944 no chrome .......................... F-15   $ 0.75
  10. 1944 no chrome ......................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  11. 1944 no chrome ................. scratch XF-40   $ 2.00
  12. 1944 no chrome ......................... MS-65  $215.00

1945 5 CENT


  1. 1945 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1945 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1945 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1945 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.25
  5. 1945 ..................... faint scratch XF-45   $ 1.00
  6. 1945 ................................... AU-50   $ 1.50
  7. 1945 ................................... AU-55   $ 2.00
  8. 1945 ....... die break in hair ......... MS-62   $ 4.25
  9. 1945 ....... die break in hair ......... MS-62   $ 4.50
     
  10. 1945 incomplete chrome ................. MS-62   $ 8.00
     
  11. 1945 no chrome ............... scratches VF-20   $ 0.75
  12. 1945 no chrome ......... minor scratches VF-20   $ 1.00
  13. 1945 no chrome ........... light scratch XF-40   $ 3.00

When the war ended there was no longer a nickel shortage so 1946 saw a return to both the standard "beaver" design, and the use of a nickel alloy, but retaining the 12 side form used since the 1942 tombac.


1946 5 CENT


  1. 1946 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.75
  2. 1946 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.50
  3. 1946 ...................... light marks, XF-40   $ 1.25
  4. 1946 ................................... XF-40   $ 2.50
  5. 1946 ................................... XF-45   $ 5.00
  6. 1946 ................................... AU-50   $ 7.50

1946 6/6 5 CENT

1946 double date 5 cent

Some 1946 nickels show what at first appears to be a slight doubling inside of the 6, and are known as the 6/6 variety. On closer examination, rather than a true doubling of the 6 it is probably die deterioration in that region that causes this appearance. Most of them have about the amount of doubling you see on our image, but some examples also show doubling to the left side of the tail of the 6, which I will note as being "strong doubling".


  1. 1946 6/6 .................... minor marks F-12   $ 4.00
  2. 1946 strong 6/6 ......................... F-15   $ 5.00

1946 5 CENT - ARROWHEAD

A distinct triangular mark occures inside the 6 of some examples, and is known as the "arrowhead" variety. These were listed by Hans Zoel as P176a.


  1. 1946 arrowhead .......................... F-12   $ 1.00

1947 5 CENT

1947 dot 5 cent

Some 1947'S have a small dot behind the 7 which some believe was intentional to mark where the maple leaf was to be punched, but never was. There are other dots in other positions on these, suggesting the dots result from die deterioration. They are a recognized variety and widely collected.


  1. 1947 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.75
  2. 1947 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.75
     
  3. 1947 dot ................................ F-12   $26.00
  4. 1947 dot ............................... VF-30   $59.50

1947 MAPLE LEAF 5 CENT

When India received its independence in 1947, "IND IMP" (India's Emperor) had to be removed from all British Commonwealth coins dated after 1947. The new designs were prepared in England and did not arrive in Canada until late in 1948. While waiting for the new designs, coins dated 1947 a small maple leaf after the date, were minted in 1948.


  1. 1947 maple leaf ........................ VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1947 maple leaf ........................ VF-30   $ 1.00
  3. 1947 maple leaf ........................ XF-40   $ 2.00

When the new dies with the new inscriptions were finally ready later in 1948, 5 cent pieces of that date were struck. The new design for the obverse included not just a new inscription, but the King's portrait was also slightly redesigned, with a slightly higher relief, and much bolder hair lines. Due to having been minted only later in the year, the mintage for 1948 5 cent coins was lower than for most years around that time.


1948 5 CENT


  1. 1948 .................................... VG-8   $ 0.75
  2. 1948 ................................... VF-20   $ 1.50
  3. 1948 ................................... VF-30   $ 2.50
  4. 1948 ................................... MS-62   $ 27.50
  5. 1948 .............................. ICCS MS-64   $ 62.50

1949 5 CENT


  1. 1949 ................................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1949 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.00
  3. 1949 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.50
  4. 1949 ................................... XF-45   $ 2.50
     
  5. 1949 spikes behind head, heavy die clash AU-55   $12.50

1950 5 CENT


  1. 1950 ................................... VF-30   $ 1.00
  2. 1950 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.50
  3. 1950 double spike behind neck .......... XF-40   $ 2.00
  4. 1950 ................................... XF-45   $ 2.25
  5. 1950 ................................... AU-50   $ 3.25
  6. 1950 .............................. ICCS MS-64   $52.50

Because of the economic importance of nickel from the Sudbury deposits to the Canadian economy, the 200th anniversary of the Swedish chemist A. F. Cronstedt's discovery of nickel was commemorated with a special 5 cent coin showing the Sudbury nickel refinery. As they were unusual, people saved them in large numbers and today they are extremely common even in high quality, and significantly worn ones almost do not exist. Please note that all of these commemorative's are the High Relief portrait type, which is only rare on the beaver type as discussed below.

Canada 5 cent 1951
image of 1951 5 commemorative cent, type only

1951 COMMEMORATIVE 5 CENT


  1. 1951 commemorative ..................... XF-40   $ 0.50
  2. 1951 commemorative ..................... XF-45   $ 0.75
  3. 1951 commemorative ..................... AU-50   $ 1.00
  4. 1951 commemorative ..................... MS-60   $ 2.25
  5. 1951 commemorative ................ ICCS MS-63   $ 8.00

The Korean war created a nickel shortage so again chrome-plated steel blanks with the standard beaver design were strick. The high-relief obverse introduced in 1948 proved difficult to strike on steel blanks so after a few had been struck the mint brought back the pre-1948 low relief portrait, with which most 1951 beaver nickels, and all 1952 nickels were struck.

As with all of the chrome plated steel nickels struck in 1951, 1952, 1953 and 1954, the chrome plating scratched easily and it is fairly difficult to find examples below a grade of VF-30 which do not have some light scratches on them.


1951 BEAVER 5 CENT

On the rare 1951 (beaver design) the final A in GRATIA behind the King's head point directly at a denticle whicn on the very common low relief it points between two denticles.


  1. 1951 beaver high relief lt rv. scratches VF-30  $775.00
     
  2. 1951 beaver low relief ................. VF-20   $ 0.50
  3. 1951 beaver low relief ................. XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1951 beaver low relief ................. AU-55   $ 2.50

1952 5 CENT


  1. 1952 ................................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  2. 1952 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00

_

ELIZABETH II
1953 to present

Young Head Series



INCO nickel was still used from 1953 until about 1961 when the mint switched to Sherritt nickel refined by a leaching process that resulted in 99.9% pure nickel. The inconsistent purity and hardness of the INCO nickel again resulted in inconsistent strikes with the sharpness of details on the laurels in Queen Elizabeth's hair very different from coin to coin, again making these difficult to grade accurately. The 1961 switch to Sherritt nickel solved that but created a new problem because the much purer Sherritt nickel was slightly softer making the coins less resisted bag marking which is why nickels from 1961 to 1967 are very difficult to find in MS-65 (even MS-64) and command higher prices in that grades than do 1950's nickels, in spite if having much higher mintages.


1960 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)


When the first coins of Elizabeth appeared in 1953, it was noticed that her shoulder appeared to be bare. This resulted from the fold of cloth on her shoulder being too weakly engraved into the dies to strike up well with only traces or none visible on most coins. These are known as the no-shoulder-strap or no-shoulder fold variety, usually abbreviated as NSS or NSF, but the best way to identify them is by "I"'s in the obverse inscription which have a distinct flare at both the top and bottom. There is also a slightly wider (than on the later type) gap between the small maples leaf's to the upper right and left and the denticles around the rim, which is why these are known as the "far leaf" variety, although the entire design is slightly smaller and the date is also further from the rim.



1953 nickle far leaf
1953 far leaf, note gap between ML's and denticles

1953 NSS FAR LEAF 5 CENT


  1. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  2. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  3. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... XF-45   $ 1.50
  4. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... AU-50   $ 2.00
  5. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-60   $ 3.50
  6. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-62   $ 5.00
  7. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-63   $ 6.50
  8. 1953 NSS far leaf ...................... MS-64   $16.50

To correct the bare shouldered look, part way through 1953 new dies were prepared with a deeper shoulder fold that struck up better and at the same time the shape of the "I"'s in the inscription were changed to straighter without that distinct flare. These are known as the shoulder-strap (abbreviated SS) or shoulder-fold (SF) variety. On the reverse the entire design was made slightly larger resulting in a smaller gap between the maples leaf's and the denticles (they nearly touch the denticles) so this is known as the "near leaf" variety", although because the design is bigger the date is also closer to the rims.


1953 nickle near leaf
1953 near leaf ML' nearly touch denticles on the left

1951 SS NEAR LEAF 5 CENT


  1. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... VF-20   $ 0.50
  2. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... VF-30   $ 0.75
  3. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  4. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... XF-45   $ 1.75
  5. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... AU-50   $ 2.00
  6. 1953 SS near leaf ...................... AU-55   $ 3.50

1953 MULE ERROR 5 CENT

Due to incorrect die pairings a small number of 1951 nickels exist as either "SS far leaf" or "NSS near leaf" varieties. Miss-matched die pairs are known as "mule errors" with the "SS far leaf" is commonly called the SS mule, and the "NSS near leaf" the NSS mule.


  1. 1953 SS Mule ........................... VF-20  $335.00
  2. 1953 SS Mule ......... NICE SURFACES ... VF-30  $475.00

1954 5 CENT


  1. 1954 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.50
  2. 1954 ................................... XF-45   $ 2.00
  3. 1954 ................................... AU-50   $ 2.50
  4. 1954 ................................... AU-55   $ 4.00
  5. 1954 ................................... MS-60   $ 6.00
  6. 1954 ................................... MS-62   $ 8.00
  7. 1954 ................................... MS-63   $12.50
  8. 1954 .............................. ICCS MS-63   $12.50

1955 5 CENT


  1. 1955 ................................... XF-40   $ 1.00
  2. 1955 ................................... XF-45   $ 1.50
  3. 1955 ................................... AU-50   $ 2.00
  4. 1955 ................................... MS-60   $ 3.50
  5. 1955 ................................... MS-62   $ 4.00
  6. 1955 ........................ cameo PROOF-LIKE   $21.00

1956 5 CENT


  1. 1956 ................................... AU-50   $ 1.50
  2. 1956 ................................... AU-55   $ 2.00
  3. 1956 ................................... MS-60   $ 2.50
  4. 1956 ................................... MS-63   $ 5.00
  5. 1956 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $60.00

1957 5 CENT

1957 bug tail 5 cent

One of the dies developed a die pit on the tip of the beavers tail, resulting in coins with a raised dot in that position resulting in a variety known as the "bug tail".


  1. 1957 .............................. ICCS MS-64   $12.50
  2. 1957 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $42.50
  3. 1957 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 8.50
  4. 1957 .............................. ICCS PL-66   $13.50
     
  5. 1957 bug tail ................ scratches VF-20   $ 1.50
  6. 1957 bug tail .......................... VF-20   $ 2.50
  7. 1957 bug tail ................ scratches VF-30   $ 2.00
  8. 1957 bug tail .......................... VF-30   $ 3.50

1958 5 CENT

Some 1958 five cents show a slight doubling of the 1 and 8 in the date, and are known as the double date, although sometimes ICCS calles them just double 18.


  1. 1958 ................................... AU-50   $ 0.75
  2. 1958 ................................... MS-62   $ 2.25
  3. 1958 ................................... MS-63   $ 3.50
  4. 1958 ................................... PL-64   $ 8.00
  5. 1958 double date (double 18) ...... ICCS MS-64   $65.00

1959 5 CENT


  1. 1959 ................................... MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1959 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  3. 1959 ................................... MS-64   $12.50
  4. 1959 .............................. ICCS MS-64   $12.50
  5. 1959 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 5.00

1960 5 CENT

Some 1960 5 cents are struck missing much of the fur on the beaver's back, resulting in a variety known as the "bald beaver", which Zoell listed it as his Y192b.


  1. 1960 ................................... MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1960 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.50
     
  3. 1960 bald beaver ....................... VF-20   $ 2.50

1961 is the hear the mint switched from the harder INCO nickel to purer softer Sherritt nickel, and I have heard this referred to as the year the beaver got it's whiskers back due to the better quality strikes.


1961 5 CENT

Some 1961 5 cents have a weak doubling of the bottoms of the "61", probably from the same striking problem discussed below for the 1962 double date.


  1. 1961 ................................... MS-60   $ 0.50
  2. 1961 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  3. 1961 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.50
     
  4. 1961 doubled 61 ........................ XF-40   $ 2.00

1962 5 CENT

1962 5 cent

Some 1962 nickels have distinctive doubling of the date. Usually more than just the bottom of the date is doubled, but the bottom is where it shows more prominently. As the strengh of the doubling varies, it is likely this is a striking problem, and that the doubling was not actually on the die. The price in trend for a 1962 double date is for an average one. Examples where the doubling is very strong are worth a premium.


  1. 1962 ................................... MS-62   $ 0.75
  2. 1962 ................................... MS-64   $12.50
  3. 1962 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
     
  4. 1962 double date .... obverse scratches, VF-20   $ 2.00
  5. 1962 double date .... obverse scratches, XF-40   $ 2.50
  6. 1962 double date very strong double ICCS MS-63   $22.50

1963 5 CENT

Some 1963 nickels have doubling of the beaver's head, along the beaver's back, on the K of the K.G. designers initials, and minor doubling on the bottom of some of the letters in CENTS. While this type is not listed in the major reference books on Canadian coins, Hans Zoell listed it as his #R195j, although he does not seem to noted the doubling of CENTS.

  1. 1963 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50
     
  2. 1963 doubled beaver ........ lt scratches F-15   $ 3.00
  3. 1963 doubled beaver .......... scratches VF-20   $ 4.00
  4. 1963 doubled beaver .......... scratches VF-30   $ 5.00

1964 5 CENT

1964 extra water line 5 cent

One 1964 reverse die developed a heavy die crack above the water lines to the left of the beaver. The die crack looks like an extra waterline, resulting in the extra waterline (XWL) variety.


  1. 1964 ................................... MS-63   $ 1.00
  2. 1964 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50
  3. 1964 .................. heavy cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 4.00
     
  4. 1964 sl doubling of bottom of date ..... XF-40   $ 2.00
     
  5. 1964 extra water line ......... scratched F-12   $16.50
  6. 1964 extra water line ........ scratched XF-40   $21.50
  7. 1964 extra water line ....... ICCS cameo MS-63  $165.00

Starting in 1965, the Queen's portrait was updated to a more mature head, wearing a tiara.

1966 canada 5 cent
(image of type only)

1965 5 CENT


  1. 1965 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50

1966 5 CENT


  1. 1966 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50

In 1967, to celebrate Canada's 100th anniversary as a country, all of the standard circulating coins were issued depicting various animals common to Canada, with a rabbit on these 5 cent coins. Please note that the examples of this type we offer here are exceptional examples, either Proof-likes, Specimens or high end MS examples, often with a cameo portrait and/or rabbit. Normal examples, even in MS-60 to 63, or examples from proof-like or specimens sets with any problems, are very common and of no significant value beyond what you can spend them for, so we do not offer them here. For most coins if listed as cameo it is only the portrait side where the cameo effect is important. On these 1967 coins many people like the cameo effect on the animals, so for these we will note if the cameo is on the portrait, on the rabbit, or both (you seldom get it on both, but they do show up sometimes in the specimen sets).


1967 5 CENT


  1. 1967 rabbit ....................... PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.50
  2. 1967 rabbit .......... cameo portrait SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
  3. 1967 rabbit ............ cameo rabbit SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
  4. 1967 rabbit ...... heavy cameo rabbit SPECIMEN   $ 4.00

In 1968, there was a return to the standard beaver design. For most dates of 5 cent coins from 1968 and newer, there is no collectable value unless in very high quality (generally MS-63 or higher), or if there are special strikes from mint sets, such as proof-likes, specimens or Proofs, or oddities such as a rare variety or a cameo portrait. If you do not see a particular date listed below, do not assume it is rare. It is more likely so common that we do not have one nice enough to be of enough value to justify listing it.


1968 5 CENT


  1. 1968 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1968 ........................ cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00

1969 5 CENT


  1. 1969 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1970 5 CENT


  1. 1970 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

Beginning in 1971, the mint begins striking three different striking qualities of coins, with a fourth added in 1981 :

Mint state (abbreviated MS) which are coins struck for issue through the banks and have average lustre and surface qualities. In most cases MS coins have little value unless in the highest range of the MS coins, and those are seldom seen. We don't list most dates in MS because they are not of high enough value to justify the time and trouble to list and/or ship them.

Proof-like (abbreviated PL) are standard mint set coins, usually from the pliofilm packaged sets, red double penny sets, and later the blue book set, but in later dates there were a variety of other types of sets they can come from. PL coins have a much higher lustre than MS coins, mostly because they are struck from dies in their newest die state. They also have very minimal marks (the average PL is a PL-64) as they did not go through as many of the mint handling processes as MS coins do, but they are not perfect coins and one should not expect them to be absolutely mark free.

Specimen (abbreviated SP or SPEC) which were in the black leather double dollar sets from 1971 to 1980, and for later dates in various types sets. Like PL coins they are struck from dies in their freshest die state but differ in being double struck to give them a higher lustre and sharper images, and they do not go through any mint handling processes before going into the sets so are nearly mark free. The rims tend and edges tend to be a little sharper although this is not obvious on a casual inspection. When we list a coin as being a specimen, it is because we personally took it from a specimen set before listing it here.

Proof (abbreviated PR) coins are very nice coins found mostly issued in the double dollar black leather boxed proof sets starting in 1981, although some specialty coins did come other ways. The coins are clearly differing from the other striking qualities by being double struck from specially prepared dies so they have mirror fields and frosted images (and ultra cameo effect) and are specially handled so they go into the sets in near perfect condition as possible.


1971 5 CENT


  1. 1971 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1971 ........................ cameo PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.50

1972 5 CENT


  1. 1972 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1973 5 CENT


  1. 1973 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1974 5 CENT


  1. 1974 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1975 5 CENT


  1. 1975 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1976 5 CENT


  1. 1976 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1977 5 CENT

1977 saw some dies with the 7's in the date punched into the die a little lower than on other dies. This created what are known as the "low 7" and "high 7" varieties. The "low 7" variety is the scarcer of the two and only occurs in MS strikes. All 1977 nickels in Proof-like and Specimen sets are the high seven variety.


  1. 1977 high 7 ....................... PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1977 high 7 ......................... SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
     
  3. 1977 low 7 ............................. MS-62   $ 0.50
  4. 1977 low 7 ............................. MS-63   $ 1.00

1978 5 CENT


  1. 1978 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1979 5 CENT


  1. 1979 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1980 5 CENT


  1. 1980 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1981 5 CENT


  1. 1981 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1981 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

In 1982, our nickels changed significantly when the alloy was changed from pure nickel in 1981 and earlier, to a cupro-nickel alloy of 75% copper and 25% nickel. The size and weight remained the same at 21.21 mm diameter, 1.75 mm thick, and 4.54 grams. They look no different than the earlier ones but they will not attract to a magnet as the earlier pure nickel ones did. There is one peculiarity to the 1982 examples which we don't see on the later ones, in that in the proof sets they nearly all have toned to a light golden color, although I am not certain why this happens to only those of 1982.


1982 5 CENT


  1. 1982 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1982 ........ light toned as usual ..... PROOF   $ 2.50

1983 5 CENT


  1. 1983 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1983 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1984 5 CENT


  1. 1984 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1984 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1985 5 CENT


  1. 1985 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75

1986 5 CENT


  1. 1986 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1986 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1987 5 CENT


  1. 1987 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1987 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1988 5 CENT


  1. 1988 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1988 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1989 5 CENT


  1. 1989 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1989 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1990 5 CENT


  1. 1990 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1990 ................................... PROOF   $ 4.00

1991 5 CENT


  1. 1991 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 3.00
  2. 1991 ................................... PROOF   $ 6.50

1992 5 CENT


  1. 1992 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 1992 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1993 5 CENT


  1. 1993 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1993 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1994 5 CENT


  1. 1994 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1994 ................................... PROOF   $ 2.50

1995 5 CENT


  1. 1995 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1995 ................................... PROOF   $ 3.50

Starting with 1996, all of the Proof strikes of five cent coins are of sterling (92.5%) silver at 5.5 grams, while proof-like, specimen and circulation strike coins are still of cupro-nickel alloy of 75% copper and 25% nickel. Because the mint did not create a fully sealed packaging for the proof sets, silver coins in these sets will often have a light golden brown toning, especially around the edges and one should expect these coins to have some of that toning, which can be fairly attractive on them.

There are near and far 6 varieties of the 1996 nickel, defined by the space between the tail of the 6 and the D of CANADA, but all those in mint sets are the near 6 variety, and the only place both turn up is in circulation strikes. Starting in 1996, the specimen strikes have a more matte finish background with mirror finish designs, different than the Proof-like strikes which have a mirror finish over the entire coin, although this difference can be somewhat subtle the coins can be differentiated so we do list them separately.


1996 5 CENT


  1. 1996 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   SOLD
  2. 1996 Far 6 ............................. MS-62   SOLD

1997 5 CENT


  1. 1997 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1997 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  3. 1997 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 7.00

1998 5 CENT

In 1998, the Mint experimented with proof-like and specimen sets struck at Winnipeg with a small "W" to the lower front of the Queen's head. The experiment was abandoned part way through the year after which such sets were only at Ottawa without the "W". All circulation strike (MS) and Proof coins were struck at Ottawa without the "W".


  1. 1998 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1998 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.25
  3. 1998 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 8.00
  4. 1998 W ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 2.00

1999 5 CENT


  1. 1999 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 1999 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
  3. 1999 ............................ silver PROOF   $12.50

1999 P TEST 5 CENT

In 1999, as a cost saving measure, the Canadian Mint made plans to strike 1, 5, 10, 25 and 50 cent coins on plated steel blanks with were first nickel plated, then copper plated and then for all denominations other than the 1 cent nickel plated again. A small "P" was placed below the Queen's portrait indicating they are on plated steel cored blanks. No 1999 "P" coins were issued for circulation but rather were test coins so vending machine companies could calibrate their machines to accept these coins, after which they were supposted to return them to the mint. A few ended up on the market at very high prices, so the mint got in on the action and made about 20,000 sets to sell to collectors.

The packaging was similar to Proof-like sets, so I call them Proof-likes, although their exact status is not certain.


  1. 1999 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   SOLD

2000 5 CENT

The first circulation strike "P" coins were minted in 2000 but only the five cent denomination was officially released. Circulation strikes exist in both "P" and non-"P" coins with the P coins being slightly scarcer. Only non-P coins were in the mint sets. Some Proof-like sets were made at Winnipeg with the W mint mark.


  1. 2000 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 2000 ................................ SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
  3. 2000 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 8.00
     
  4. 2000 W ............................ PROOF-LIKE   SOLD

Two special commemorative 5 cents were issued in 2000. The first commemorates the Les Voltigeurs regiment headquartered in Quebec which was formed in 1862 and served as an armored regiment during world war II. The second commemorates the Royal Military College of Canada established at Kingston Ontario in 1874. Both are struck on 21.3 mm diameter, 1.85 mm thickness, 5.3 gram sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) flans.


2000 COMMEMORATIVE 5 CENTS


  1. 2000 Voltigeur commemorative ........... PROOF   $17.50
     
  2. 2000 Military college commemorative .... PROOF   SOLD

2001 5 CENT

Both P and non-P coins were minted in 2001.


  1. 2001 ...................................... BU   SOLD
     
  2. 2001 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  3. 2001 p .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 1.50
     
  4. 2001 ............................ silver PROOF   $ 8.00

2002 5 CENT

2002 was the 50th anniversary of the Queen's accession and the coins are unusual as they have the dates as 1952-2002 below the Queen's head. There is no date on the reverse. All 5 cents but the silver Proof's have the P.


  1. 2002 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 2002 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
     
  3. 2002 ............................ silver PROOF   $10.00

The new uncrowned portrait of the Queen was introduced in 2003 and while it is known as the Coronation Portrait because it celebrated the 50th anniversary of her coronation, it continued to be the standard portrait on all years after 2003. and which became the standard portrait after 2003.


2003 5 CENT

The old crowned portrait was used for the first part of 2003, then the new un-crowned coronation portrait was used for the last part of the year. The P is seen on all but the silver proof's which are all crowned head, and in some of the mint sets we get the only coins issued with both the W for Winnipeg and the P for plated. The un-crowned head is also known as the "New Effigy".


  1. 2003 P crowned head ............... PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
  2. 2003 P crn head, ICCS NUMISMATIC BU (PL) MS-67   $25.00
  3. 2003 P crowned head ................. SPECIMEN   $ 2.50
     
  4. 2003 crowned head ............... silver PROOF   SOLD
     
  5. 2003 P uncrowned head ............. ICCS MS-64   SOLD

2004 5 CENT


  1. 2004 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  2. 2004 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 2.00
     
  3. 2004 ............................ silver PROOF   $12.00

2004 D DAY 5 CENT

2004 was the 60th anniversary of the D day landing so 5 cent coins with the reverse based on the 1943 to 1945 V nickels were issued but with the dates 1944 - 2004 flanking the V, and random dot's and dashes where the Morse code around the edge should have been. These only come in proof quality, on 12 sided 21.3 mm, 5.3 gram sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) flans.


  1. 2004 D DAY ............................. PROOF   SOLD

2005 5 CENT


  1. 2005 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 2005 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 1.75
     
  3. 2005 ............................ silver PROOF   $12.50

2005 V-E DAY 5 CENT

2005 was the 60th anniversary of Victory in European (V-E Day) so a special commemorative 5 cent issued. The designs copy the 1943 to 1945 V nickels but with the dates as 1945 - 2005 flanking the V. The circulation (MS) and Proof-like coins lack the Morse code around the edge and are struck on the same blanks are regular nickels with the P for plated. Silver proof examples were also struck, but an attempt at morse code around the edge (I am not sure it is correct morse code) on 12 sided on 21.3 mm, 5.3 gram sterling silver (92.5% silver, 7.5% copper) blanks. A few Proofs used in Mint reports have selective gold plating on the V and torch, and the portrait of George VI on the obverse.


  1. 2005 P, V-E day commemorative ............. BU   $ 0.75
     
  2. 2005 V-E day .................... silver PROOF   $20.00
     
  3. 2005 V-E day, selective gold ...... ICCS PR-66   $55.00

2006 5 CENT

Earlier in 2006 all 5 cents but silver proofs are on plated blanks marked with the P. This was the last occurrence the P as later in the year the it was replaced with the mint logo of a stylized maple leaf. MS and PL coins exist with the logo, but no 2006 in Specimen strikes were made with it.


  1. 2006 P ................................. MS-63   $ 0.75
  2. 2006 P ............................ PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.50
  3. 2006 P .............................. SPECIMEN   $ 2.50
     
  4. 2006 ............................ silver PROOF   $12.00
     
  5. 2006 LOGO ...... ICCS NUMISMATIC BU (PL) MS-67   SOLD

Starting in 2007, all Canada 5 cents in all striking qualities including the silver proof coins, have the stylized maple leaf mint logo below the Queen's bust, so from here on we will not mention the logo's.


2007 5 CENT


  1. 2007 .............................. ICCS MS-65   $16.50
  2. 2007 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 0.75
  3. 2007 ............................ silver PROOF   $12.50

2008 5 CENT


  1. 2008 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   $ 1.00
  2. 2008 ............................ silver PROOF   SOLD

2009 5 CENT


  1. 2009 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   SOLD
  2. 2009 ............................ silver PROOF   SOLD

2010 5 CENT


  1. 2010 .............................. PROOF-LIKE   SOLD
  2. 2010 ............................ silver PROOF   SOLD


Starting in 2011 the mint stopped making intentionally superior quality coins for the Proof-like (standard) mint sets but rather put standard MS coins that had not gone through most mint handling processes into the sets. From here on I will make no attempt to differentiate a mint set (Proof-like) coin from MS coin. This means there is no way to differentiate an MS-65 or better coin taken from a set, from an MS-65 or MS-66 taken from a bank roll, which in turn means bank roll coins can carry no premium in those grades even though they will continue to be rare from rolls. This has the odd result that from here on out, MS-64 coin will now be rarer (although of less value) than MS-65 and MS-66 coins.


2011 5 CENT


  1. 2011 ...................................... BU   SOLD
  2. 2011 ............................ silver PROOF   SOLD

2013 5 CENT


  1. 2013 .............................. ICCS MS-64   SOLD

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ALL PRICES ON THIS PAGE ARE IN CANADIAN DOLLARS
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